June 3 1813: Byron Writes to His Lawyer

On June 3 1813, Lord Byron writes to his lawyer John Hanson. He is still planning to leave England but has a number of loose ends to settle. In particular, Byron appears to have resolved the problems with the sale of his Newstead Abbey to Thomas Claughton. He will be receiving two further payments of £7,500 each in July 1813 to complete the  deposit for the sale. Claughton had raised a number of objections that had delayed the sale and stopped the flow of funds. In fact, Byron will received some more money from the sale but will never complete the sale to Claughton, who simply does not have the money to do so. On June 3 1813, Byron writes to Hanson that he is firm on his intention to leave England: “Do not trifle with me, for I am in very solid serious earnest, and if utter ruin were, or is before me, on the one hand — and wealth at home on the other,— I have made my choice, and go I will… You shan’t be troubled with me these ten years, if ever. ” 

June 3d, 1813.

Dear Sir,—When you receive this I shall have left town for a week, and, as it is perfectly right we should understand each other, I think you will not be surprised at my persisting in my intention of going abroad. If the Suit can be carried on in my absence,—well; if not, it must be given up. One word, one letter, to Cn. would put an end to it; but this I shall not do, at all events without acquainting you before hand; nor at all, provided I am able to go abroad again. But at all hazards, at all losses, on this last point I am as determined as I have been for the last six months, and you have always told me that you would endeavour to assist me in that intention. Every thing is ordered and ready now. Do not trifle with me, for I am in very solid serious earnest, and if utter ruin were, or is before me, on the one hand—and wealth at home on the other,— I have made my choice, and go I will.

If you wish to write, address a line before Saturday to Salthill Post Office; Maidenhead, I believe, but am not sure, is the Post town; but I shall not be in town till Wednesday next.

Believe me, yours ever,

BN.

P. S.—Let all the books go to Mr. Murray’s immediately, and let the plate, linen, etc., which I find excepted by the contract, be sold, particularly a large silver vase—with the contents not removed as they are curious, and a silver cup (not the skull) be sold also—both are of value.

The Pictures also, and every moveable that is mine, and can be converted into cash; all I want is a few thousand pounds, and then adieu. You shan’t be troubled with me these ten years, if ever.

1 thought on “June 3 1813: Byron Writes to His Lawyer

  1. Pingback: Top Ten Posts: 1813/2013 | pastnow

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