May 17 1816: Baffled by the Weather

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—you will have seen from our papers the designation of our next president. there will be no republican opposition to Monroe. the federal states of Connecticut & Delaware, & the feeble and declining federal majorities of Massachusets and Rhode island will oppose pro formâ only. he will certainly therefore be our next president. there is great and general content in this country with the conduct of our administration and the issue of the war. altho’ our taxes this year have been five times greater than we ever paid before, they have been paid with unexampled chearfulness and punctuality. I hope therefore the debt contracted will be diminished rapidly. the great prices given for tobacco have produced great preparations for the present year, which however will be baffled by the weather. the spring has been unusually dry and cold. our average morning cold for the month of May in other years has been 63° of Farenheit. in the present month it has been to this day an average of 53° and one morning as low as 43°. repeated frosts have killed the early fruits and the crops of tobacco and wheat will be poor. about the middle of April they had at Quebec snow a foot deep.

— Thomas Jefferson writes to David Bailie Warden, May 17 1816.

May 16 1816: I Detest the Cause & the Victors

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On May 16, 1816, Lord Byron writes to John Cam Hobhouse, from Carlsruhe.

My dear Hobhouse / We are this far by the Rhenish route on our way to Switzerland – where I shall wait to hear of your intentions as to junction before I go to Italy. – – – I have written to you three times – and mention the number – in case of any non=arrival of epistles. – We were obliged to diverge from Anvers & Mechlin to Brussels – for some wheel repairs – & in course seized the opportunity to visit Mont St . Jean &c . where I had a gallop over the field on a Cossac horse (left by some of the Don gentlemen at Brussels) and after a tolerably minute investigation – returned by Soignies – having purchased a quantity of helmets sabres &c . all of which are consigned to the care of a Mr . Gordon at Bls (an old acquaintance) who desired to forward them to Mr . Murray – in whose keeping I hope to find them safe some day or other. – – – Continue reading

May 17 1816: Cold Spring

” — you will have seen from our papers the designation of our next president. there will be no republican opposition1 to Monroe. the federal states of Connecticut & Delaware, & the feeble and declining federal majorities of Massachusets and Rhode island will oppose pro formâ only. he will certainly therefore be our next president. there is great and general content in this country with the conduct of our administration and the issue of the war. altho’ our taxes this year have been five times greater than we ever paid before, they have been paid with unexampled chearfulness and punctuality. I hope therefore the debt contracted will be diminished rapidly. the great prices given for tobacco have produced great preparations for the present year, which however will be baffled by the weather. the spring has been unusually dry and cold. our average morning cold for the month of May in other years has been 63° of Farenheit. in the present month it has been to this day an average of 53° and one morning as low as 43°. repeated frosts have killed the early fruits and the crops of tobacco and wheat will be poor. about the middle of April they had at Quebec snow a foot deep. “

— Thomas Jefferson writes to David Bailie Warden, on May 17 1816

May 16 1816: My Dear Hobhouse

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On May 16 1816, Lord Byron writes to John Cam Hobhouse, from Carlsruhe.

My dear Hobhouse / We are this far by the Rhenish route on our way to Switzerland – where I shall wait to hear of your intentions as to junction before I go to Italy. – – – I have written to you three times – and mention the number – in case of any non=arrival of epistles. – We were obliged to diverge from Anvers & Mechlin to Brussels – for some wheel repairs – & in course seized the opportunity to visit Mont St. Jean &c . where I had a gallop over the field on a Cossac horse (left by some of the Don gentlemen at Brussels) and after a tolerably minute investigation – returned by Soignies – having purchased a quantity of helmets sabres &c . all of which are consigned to  the care of a Mr . Gordon at Bls (an old acquaintance) who desired to forward them to Mr . Murray – in whose keeping I hope to find them safe some day or other. – – – Continue reading